Micro micropiles for decks and other light structures

Micro micropiles for decks and other light structures

I want to use a 3" round helical pile as temporary casing for a grouted micropile that has to be at least as strong as the 4×4 deck post that will sit on top of it.

The idea is to screw the pile to the desired depth, well below the frost line, then use the 12" helix to bell the bottom of the hole by rotating the pile up and down. Next, add threaded rod or pipe down into the casing and pump it all full of grout. Slowly unscrew the helical pile while continuing to add grout, filling the hole from the bottom of the pile as it's removed. That's it. Pier & footing with no spoils, digging or back filling. A little more work than helical piles, but way cheaper material wise.

Any reason this wouldn't work? I was thinking of using 2" sch 40 steel pipe, that can handle the axial load on its own, plus the grout, and make the 12" round footing about 12" thick.

Submitted June 30, 2016 at 01:31PM by newproject2016
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Micro micropiles for decks and other light structures

PE exam and process questions

PE exam and process questions

I was wondering if someone with more experience could answer a few questions regarding the PE process.

  1. Can you take a PE exam out of your field? I have a ME undergrad but most of the work I have been doing is structural so I don't know if the mechanical exam would be appropriate.

  2. If I did go the route of taking the ME exam, would any of my structural work count as "professional" work or would it most likely fall under the "sub-professional" work?

Maybe more questions if this gets seen! Thanks in advance.

Submitted June 30, 2016 at 12:57PM by ipassenger
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PE exam and process questions

Venturi vacuum Producers with a constant ID

Venturi vacuum Producers with a constant ID

Working in the industry I've noticed a lot of air powered Venturi vacuum producers have a constant ID, with compressed air being injected through 4 to 6 angles holes into the ID angled towards the exhaust. They work decent but wouldn't it be more efficient if at the spot of the injection the ID decreased, with a sharp converging angle in and a gradual diverging angle back out? Would this just be due to manufacturing and cost savings?

Submitted June 30, 2016 at 11:41AM by Funkit
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Venturi vacuum Producers with a constant ID

Convert .sldasm to .stl or .obj or .dae or .fbx or pretty muchn anything else?

Convert .sldasm to .stl or .obj or .dae or .fbx or pretty muchn anything else?

I've recently got a file in some weird format that turns out can not be read by any sortware other than solidworks.

http://ift.tt/29636fy

Can someone convert it to pretty much any other format that can be read by other programs? Or better yet does anyone know a converter, so I can do it on my own in the future? I don't plan on downloading an 11GB software from piratebay just to convert a less than 3 MB file.

Submitted June 30, 2016 at 10:26AM by zigastrmsek
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Convert .sldasm to .stl or .obj or .dae or .fbx or pretty muchn anything else?

What kind of engineers design piping systems?

What kind of engineers design piping systems?

I am a Journeyman Pipefitter in Canada working in oil and gas and I would like a career change. My days consist of reading engineered isometrics to build piping modules that will be taken to site and pieced together. I've worked on some small projects in the past (4000 weld inches or so) where we were just given P & IDs and got to design all the piping ourselves, build it in a piping program called Acorn and then put it all together. It kicked ass having a hand in design. I'd like to go deeper down this hole and get into working with the engineering processes and I feel with my current experience it would compliment an engineering degree massively.

What sort of engineer does this? Mechanical? Recommendations of schools in Canada?

Submitted June 30, 2016 at 09:03AM by Monolithic
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What kind of engineers design piping systems?

Teaching an Engineering class, am a physicist [help]

Teaching an Engineering class, am a physicist [help]

I will be teaching an engineering class starting this fall. The problem is that I am trained as a physicist, not an engineer (my primary job is teaching physics, I didn't lie on my resume or anything).

I am trying to come up with some chemical engineering projects for the kids (Juniors and Seniors in HS), and I thought that soap making, and candy making might be a good idea.

With candy, one can test the brittleness of the resulting candy, as well as its ability to test shearing forces, tensile forces and compression forces. These parameters can be mapped against the final temperature of the batch, the amount of sugar, and the starting-final mass of the ingredients (to test how much water has evaporated). I think that this is simple enough (COMMENTS AND CRITICISMS ARE WELCOME, I AM LOOKING FOR HELP!)

Another (possibly more simple) project might be to make soap. The kids could use different starting oils, and different bases (potassium hydroxide vs. sodium hydroxide) and test the resulting soaps.

I have many questions:

First, is this even what engineers do?!

Are these projects applicable to chemical engineering?

Are there any other pertinent tests (or more pertinent tests) that would be better for the candy?

What can be tested with the soap? (I would like to test its hardness [since different bases and oils are supposed to produce different levels of hardness], as well as its efficacy… I was thinking of putting a set volume of vegetable oil in a test tube, dissolving a set mass of soap in a set volume of water, mixing, and seeing how much oil was absorbed by the different soaps. Is this a thing that can even be done?

Thank you!

Submitted June 30, 2016 at 09:16AM by quantumturtles
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Teaching an Engineering class, am a physicist [help]