Free Probability Distribution App for Students

Free Probability Distribution App for Students

Hey guys,

I created an Android application that has probability distribution calculators and flash cards for several common distributions.

The app is useful for students enrolled in probability courses, or for those looking for a quick way to calculate certain metrics from probability distributions

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.bignerdranch.android.exampapp

Hope this helps a few people out.

If you find it useful, it would be great to hear some feedback!

Submitted June 19, 2018 at 07:52PM by ac2uary
via reddit https://ift.tt/2yseWBC

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Free Probability Distribution App for Students

New ME grad in Canada. I really always wanted an office job, working as a project engineer or project controls engineer. My first job offer is a field engineer position with an oil & gas company. It is not what I wanted at all but I applied and got it. Should I take it?

New ME grad in Canada. I really always wanted an office job, working as a project engineer or project controls engineer. My first job offer is a field engineer position with an oil & gas company. It is not what I wanted at all but I applied and got it. Should I take it?

This is not where I want to be, but most people advise me saying that I should not give this up, and/or look for jobs while I work here. I wanted to work in something like infrastructure or other industries, hell even technology but I don't really get call backs from there. What should I do? I am in Canada where the job market is constantly awful.

Submitted June 19, 2018 at 07:27PM by MaybeAnEnggGirlMaybe
via reddit https://ift.tt/2K2gNhN

New ME grad in Canada. I really always wanted an office job, working as a project engineer or project controls engineer. My first job offer is a field engineer position with an oil & gas company. It is not what I wanted at all but I applied and got it. Should I take it?

Wikipedia article of the day for June 20, 2018

The Wikipedia article of the day for June 20, 2018 is Ontario Highway 61.
King’s Highway 61 is a provincially maintained highway in the Canadian province of Ontario that forms part of the Lake Superior Circle Tour. The 61-kilometre (38 mi) route extends from a junction at Highway 11, Highway 17 and the Harbour Expressway in Thunder Bay south to a bridge over the Pigeon River, where it crosses into the United States and becomes Minnesota State Highway 61. The roads on either side of the river were completed in 1916, but there was no bridge to connect them. Funding for a bridge over the international crossing at the Pigeon River required federal approval from both governments, but local civic groups in Port Arthur and Duluth expected that the process would be too slow, and built it without approval. The bridge was opened by a travelling motorcade in August 1917, permitting travel between Ontario and Minnesota. To the surprise of the civic groups, Canadian and American highway officials attending the opening announced federal funding to cover the bridge costs.

Wikipedia article of the day for June 20, 2018

Thermal Conductivity of Anodized Aluminum

Thermal Conductivity of Anodized Aluminum

I am building a cooling system for a custom racecar and I am interested in coloring some of the aluminum components. My research has shown that anodizing and dying it would add negligible weight, but would the anodizing reduce the thermal conductivity of the components?

Submitted June 19, 2018 at 03:58PM by liquidpaperbee
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Thermal Conductivity of Anodized Aluminum

Electrolysis

Electrolysis

I'm attempting to create a shallow water device in which I can safely breathe. By shallow I mean 5-10 feet. Ten feet being the maximum depth I would use the device considering oxygen toxicity at different atmospheres. I would like constructive criticism and not to be called a douche or idiot. My main concerns are breathing pure oxygen for one. however that should be safe if not used for an extended amount of time given the depth I plan to use it if for some reason this comes out successful. I would need to contain the whole system in a watertight fashion and have enough power to stay under for around 10 to 15 minutes. From my research on electrolysis this should be theoretically possible in a self contained rather small unit. I'd like to have a place the oxygen can collect once it's isolated( by collect I mean one or two breaths max reserve) and the hydrogen can bubble up back into the atmosphere unless there's an efficient safe way and reason to store it. A liter of water if separated efficiently should produce 622 liters of pure oxygen however typically humans only breath give or take around 105 ml of pure oxygen per breath. I'm having trouble calculating how many volts/ amps I would need and what kind of surface area to produce at the least 105ml every 5 seconds. I would not be holding my breath while ascending or descending I would be at a constant depth. I just need more minds to help me with this as I know there are things I don't I want to be safe but I also want to be creative and adventurous. This is why I've come to reddit, to be safe , imagine that, Reddit..

Submitted June 19, 2018 at 05:11PM by Lukahawka
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Electrolysis

I don’t suppose it’s possible to get anywhere in the world of engineering without a proper grasp of maths?

I don’t suppose it’s possible to get anywhere in the world of engineering without a proper grasp of maths?

I'm dyscalculic, which is like dyslexia but with numbers, and I really love building things, taking them apart and figuring out how they work and stuff. l:

Submitted June 19, 2018 at 05:07PM by mcmanybucks
via reddit https://ift.tt/2I5g6Cx

I don’t suppose it’s possible to get anywhere in the world of engineering without a proper grasp of maths?